(Source: naughty-chekov)

(Reblogged from itswalky)

uncalar:

spikedrewthis:

Hi, folks. Here’s a five-page preview of a mini I hope to have on sale next week. (People ask me for advice on a weekly basis, anyway; might as well consolidate it all into one handy package.) Stuff I plan to include:

  • What to ask the printer
  • How to calculate your goal properly
  • How to price and sell your books
  • Good backer bonus ideas
  • Your Frenemy The Post Office
  • Self-promotion

And so on and soforth.

It’ll probably run 30 or so pages- it’s roughed out that far, anyway- And I’ll be selling it for $5.00.

I’ll drop you folks an update when it’s finished. 

Spike is an amazing artist and has proven herself to be a smart editor and saavy business woman as well! Even if you don’t lay down the $5 for her mini, these few preview pages may already help you if you’re thinking of a KS campaign. HEED HER WORDS WELL! 

^ This. Spike knows what she’s talking about, and so does Unca. Keep this info on hand always! And pay the $5 for Spike’s mini.

(Reblogged from uncalar)
(Reblogged from rosalindrobertson)
(Reblogged from space-bridge-to-nowhere)
(Reblogged from megatronstarscream)
(Reblogged from agentvictoriahand)

Anonymous asked: Say, do you know what Megatron and Starscream's heights are? Both to the wingtips, and to the head.

megatronstarscream:

Hmm, I have no idea actually! I’d imagine it varies by continuity. Deferring this one to my followers— please comment or reblog if you know the answer :)

It DOES vary by continuity! It also varies depending on the situation the bots find themselves in, as size changing is a relatively consistent component of Transformers across continuities.

You can get an approximate height estimation for G1 characters (as far as “official” anything goes) from the Ark compendium. (Which…now that I see the price on Amazon, I am glad I bought as soon as it hit the shelves. O.o; ) There are several pages of character size comparison models the animators used while drawing the series. However, there are no numbers - just a “folding paper” scale that was used to give the artists a rough idea (since the art wasn’t exactly “top notch” in every scene anyway ^^; ).

I’ve been going through it, measuring, redrawing, and translating it into a more firm model chart for G1 characters, but it’s kind of a labor of love that’s in a “as time permits” mode right now - there are a lot of bots covered and my time is at a premium right now, with my daughter due in a month. ^^;

There are also some very good comparison charts at deviantART by other artists - just search for “Transformers size comparison” in the Search box. The sizes DO vary by continuity, and you’ll also find comparisons fans have uploaded from fanverses and toys as well.

TL;DR: There are a lot of numbers and charts floating around, but no given set is “correct” in all instances. Go with what feels best for you!

(Reblogged from megatronstarscream)

gaymommy:

team-joebama:

this actually happened

obama is the most chill president ever and he is just so fucking tired of everyones shit

(Source: oliviasbenson)

(Reblogged from vh-highflyingbird)
(Reblogged from hijinksensue)

When [an abusive man] tells me that he became abusive because he lost control of himself, I ask him why he didn’t do something even worse. For example, I might say, “You called her a fucking whore, you grabbed the phone out of her hand and whipped it across the room, and then you gave her a shove and she fell down. There she was at your feet where it would have been easy to kick her in the head. Now, you have just finished telling me that you were ‘totally out of control’ at that time, but you didn’t kick her. What stopped you?” And the client can always give me a reason. Here are some common explanations:

"I wouldn’t want to cause her a serious injury."
“I realized one of the children was watching.”
“I was afraid someone would call the police.”
“I could kill her if I did that.”
“The fight was getting loud, and I was afraid the neighbors would hear.”

And the most frequent response of all:

"Jesus, I wouldn’t do that. I would never do something like that to her.”

The response that I almost never heard — I remember hearing it twice in the fifteen years — was: “I don’t know.”

These ready answers strip the cover off of my clients’ loss of control excuse. While a man is on an abusive rampage, verbally or physically, his mind maintains awareness of a number of questions: “Am I doing something that other people could find out about, so it could make me look bad? Am I doing anything that could get me in legal trouble? Could I get hurt myself? Am I doing anything that I myself consider too cruel, gross, or violent?”

A critical insight seeped into me from working with my first few dozen clients: An abuser almost never does anything that he himself considers morally unacceptable. He may hide what he does because he thinks other people would disagree with it, but he feels justified inside. I can’t remember a client ever having said to me: “There’s no way I can defend what I did. It was just totally wrong.” He invariably has a reason that he considers good enough. In short, an abuser’s core problem is that he has a distorted sense of right and wrong.

I sometimes ask my clients the following question: “How many of you have ever felt angry enough at youer mother to get the urge to call her a bitch?” Typically half or more of the group members raise their hands. Then I ask, “How many of you have ever acted on that urge?” All the hands fly down, and the men cast appalled gazes on me, as if I had just asked whether they sell drugs outside elementary schools. So then I ask, “Well, why haven’t you?” The same answer shoots out from the men each time I do this exercise: “But you can’t treat your mother like that, no matter how angry you are! You just don’t do that!”

The unspoken remainder of this statement, which we can fill in for my clients, is: “But you can treat your wife or girlfriend like that, as long as you have a good enough reason. That’s different.” In other words, the abuser’s problem lies above all in his belief that controlling or abusing his female partner is justifiable….

Lundy Bancroft, Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men (via seebster)
(Reblogged from silvysartfulness)